O’Reilly terminates licensing agreement for ACM members

A couple days ago, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) sent an email to its members informing them that the O’Reilly publishing platform was ending their longstanding licensing agreement. This agreement allowed ACM members to access online O’Reilly content. Since an ACM yearly membership is roughly 1/5 the price of an annual O’Reilly subscription, you can see why the ACM membership was so valuable, and why it was in O’Reilly’s best interest to cancel.
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Notion and Obsidian as Digital Collaborators - not Competitors

I see a lot of reviews and posts poistioning Notion against Obisidan. While that may make sense in some regard, it misses the deeper reality that these are two very different tools that actually work better together than either does individually.
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Getting Lost in Rabbit Holes

Getting Lost in Rabbit Holes
In retrospect, I should have known there was going to be a problem. It seemed like such a simple thing, after all. I just wanted to switch to YAML to define my post front matter. YAML, which stands for YAML Ain’t Markup Language, has a very simple job: it provides a structure for keyed data (or metadata) that is human readable and portable1. Even more importantly, my markdown editor (Typora) has this neat little feature that lets me set up a YAML front matter section right in the post.
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The Internet is More than Social Media

I wanted to take a moment to talk about Brian Chen’s article, “The Internet Trolls Have Won. Sorry, There’s Not Much You Can Do.” in the New York Times. It’s an interesting piece for a lot of reasons, and I like a lot of what Brian and Dr. Papacharissi have to say. That said, I have trouble with an approach that accepts the status quo as inevitable; especially, when that acceptance helps to normalizes a reliance on corporate governance as the only possible way to fix the internet and networked communications.
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Microsoft, GitHub and the Realities of Centralized Control

Update: This was a originally part of a larger post. I decided to split these discussions into two separate posts for better clarity. Let’s start with a simple fact: if your content is not controlled and not stored by you, you don’t own it. You never did. There’s been a lot of anger and fear surrounding the recent news that GitHub has been sold. For many, the worst part of that news was that they would soon have their code hosted on a Microsoft-owned platform.
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